Sea Doo Challenger 180 Cs boats for sale

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2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 CS

2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 CS

$10,500

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Year 2006

Make Sea-Doo

Model Challenger 180 CS

Category Jet Boats

Length 18

Posted Over 1 Month

This Sea-Doo has been well maintained by mechanic owner. Always stored out of the water and kept under full cover at all times. Trailer has new tires, bow connection strap, bunk boards. Mooring cover is torn and needs to be patched up or replaced. Boat is ready for new owner! Stock #098687 Fun to drive jet bowrider / watersports boat. Pull kids on a tube or waterski, sporty, sexy & fun. If you are in the market for a jet boat, look no further than this 2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 CS, just reduced to $10,500 (offers encouraged). This boat is located in Ft Lauderdale, Florida and is in good condition. She is also equipped with a Rotax engine that has only 65 hours. Reason for selling is no time to use.

2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 W/215HP ONLY 118.5 HOURS! Rotax Seats 8!

2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 W/215HP ONLY 118.5 HOURS! Rotax Seats 8!

$13,000

Cibolo, Texas

Year 2006

Make Sea Doo

Model Challenger 180 CS

Category Bowrider Boats

Length 18.0

Posted Over 1 Month

Meticulously maintained Sea-Doo Challenger 180 CS with 118.5 hours. Sea-Doo service center completed a full diagnostic check on 27 June 2015 showing a clean bill of health and 118.5 hours. THAT'S ONLY 13 HOURS A YEAR PEOPLE! This bow-rider has a FULL wrap around glass windshield and matching trailer. Fuel injected 4-TEC single engine 215hp 4-stroke SCIC (super charged inter-cooled) jet propulsion with max speed ~42 mph. Seating for 8 includes a bow filler seat cushion to convert to sun lounge. Bimini top covers main part of cabin. Clarion stereo system with factory remote control at wheel. Newer Solas stainless impeller and liner installed in 2014. Always dry stored indoor during winter. The boat and trailer can be stored on an angle into a 2 car garage. Removable snap in/out carpet with swivel/slide bucket and passenger seats. Plenty of storage spaces for gear including In-Floor Ski Storage locker, rear storage compartments, bow seat storage, large dry lockable glove box. Includes Sea-Doo danforth anchor, 2-Sea-Doo fenders, dock lines, Sea-Doo full cover, new mooring cover and an extra set of tires for trailer. Cleanest 06' you'll ever see. $13000, TEXT OR CALL(3 one 7) 4 one 3 - 1 two one 5 FROM BOAT TEST.COM CLICK HERE FOR FULL REVIEW CLICK FOR VIDEO REVIEW What do you do with a supercharged 215-hp jet boat? You have a ton of fun and make everyone else drool with envy! The new Challenger 180 has some great features, plus the added safety and maneuverability of Sea-Doo’s jet system, making it a great choice for an all-around family boat. Key Features 21-gallon fuel capacity 12-inch draft Built-in cooler 215-hp Supercharged Rotax standard Sharp, eye catching graphics Seats eight Specifications Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Specifications Length Overall 17' 7'' Dry Weight 2,075 lbs. Beam 8' 2'' Tested Weight N/A Draft 12'' Fuel Cap 21 gal. Deadrise/Transom 20 deg. Water Cap none Max Headroom open Bridge Clearance N/A Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Engine options Power 1 x 215-hp Supercharged Rotax® 4-TEC 4-Stroke Benefits of Jet Power In essence, jet power pumps water out the stern to push the boat through the water, rather than pulling a boat through the water by a propeller. Water is drawn from beneath the boat and forced through a pump inside the engine compartment, and then ejected out the back of the boat through a 6-inch diameter nozzle to propel the boat. The nozzle turns for steering, and a “reversing bucket” folds down over the nozzle to direct water straight down for neutral, and toward the bow for reverse. This offers several advantages over conventional propulsion. First is shallow draft. With rare exceptions, a propeller must be located under the bottom of a boat so it can bite into undisturbed water. Since a jet drive sucks water from below the boat and shoots it out the back, the Challenger 180 can go into water almost as shallow as the hull, about twelve inches. And with no outdrive to raise, beaching the boat is simple. One disadvantage to jets, the pump can get clogged with seaweed or debris, which is most likely to occur in very shallow water with a lot of loose seaweed on the bottom. Sea-Doo’s ICS system (Inlet Clearance System) cleans debris from the intake grid, but large amounts could still foul the pump. Improved Maneuverability Another advantage to Sea-Doo’s jet power is uncanny maneuverability. Because the jet system is always pumping water whenever the engine is running but redirecting the water for neutral or reverse, jet boats of the past were notoriously squirrelly in neutral and reverse. After testing two different Sea-Doo sportboats, I’m pleased to say the company has taken what was once considered a negative and turned it into a huge positive, particularly for beginner boaters. With the engine running and the shift in neutral, the Challenger 180 sits nearly stationary, drifting with the wind like a propeller driven boat would. But even though it is not “in gear”, the boat still steers by simply turning the wheel, hovering in one spot but still in control. To maneuver, just turn the wheel until the bow is pointed in the desired direction, shift into forward, and steer normally. While a twin engine boat with a bow thruster comes close, I have yet to run a conventional-powered recreational boat that has this ability. A third advantage to jet power, is not having a propeller outside the boat, creating much less chance of injuring a skier or swimmer, although it is always prudent to turn the engine off when a swimmer is alongside. Since a jet boat is always pumping water while running, I find it makes people turn the engine off instinctively – something often ignored on conventionally powered boats. Power and Performance To power the jet, Sea-Doo offers two Rotax engine choices, a 3-cylinder 185 horsepower four-stroke engine, and a similar engine with a supercharger and intercooler that develops 215 horsepower. Our test boat, equipped with the larger engine, topped out at 46 mph, and cruised quite economically at 28.7 mph, burning just 9.1 gph or 3.15 mpg. The boat planned off in 3.8 seconds and went from 0 to 30 in 7 seconds, with plenty of pulling power for water toys. Plenty of Features The layout of the boat should appeal to family boaters. Sea-Doo calls it a 20-foot cockpit in an 18-foot boat, and I must admit, it does have a lot of room for an 18-footer. There is plenty of seating, a large sun pad with the bow filler cushion installed, and adequate storage. The swim deck is nice too, with a telescoping boarding ladder and well placed handrails to make it easy to climb aboard. The new Challenger 180 has some great features, plus the added safety and maneuverability of Sea-Doo’s jet system, making it a great choice for an all-around family boat. Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Test Result Highlights Top speed for the Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) is 46.0 mph (74 kph), burning 18.3 gallons per hour (gph) or 69.27 liters per hour (lph). Best cruise for the Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) is 28.7 mph (46.2 kph), and the boat gets 3.15 miles per gallon (mpg) or 1.34 kilometers per liter (kpl), giving the boat a cruising range of 60 miles (96.56 kilometers). Tested power is 1 x 215-hp Supercharged Rotax®.

2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 W/215HP Rotax Seats 8!

2006 Sea-Doo Challenger 180 W/215HP Rotax Seats 8!

$13,500

Cibolo, Texas

Year 2006

Make Sea Doo

Model Challenger 180 CS

Category Bowrider Boats

Length 18.0

Posted Over 1 Month

For sale Like new and meticulously maintained Sea-Doo Challenger 180 with full wrap around glass windshield and matching trailer. Fuel injected 4-TEC single engine 215hp 4-stroke SCIC (super charged intercooled) jet propulsion with max speed ~42 mph. Seating for 8 includes a bow filler seat cushion to convert to sun lounge. Clarion stereo system with factory remote control at wheel. Newer stainless impeller and liner installed 2014. Always dry stored indoor during winter and can be stored on an angle into a 2 car garage. Removable snap in/out carpet with Swivel/slide Bucket and Passenger Seats. Plenty of storage spaces for gear including In-Floor Ski Storage locker, rear storage compartments, bow seat storage, large dry lockable glove box. Includes Sea-Doo danforth anchor, 2-Sea-Doo fenders, dock lines, Sea-Doo full cover and new mooring cover. $13500, 317-413-1215 FROM BOAT TEST.COM CLICK HERE FOR FULL REVIEW CLICK FOR VIDEO REVIEW What do you do with a supercharged 215-hp jet boat? You have a ton of fun and make everyone else drool with envy! The new Challenger 180 has some great features, plus the added safety and maneuverability of Sea-Doo’s jet system, making it a great choice for an all-around family boat. Key Features 21-gallon fuel capacity 12-inch draft Built-in cooler 215-hp Supercharged Rotax standard Sharp, eye catching graphics Seats eight Specifications Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Specifications Length Overall 17' 7'' Dry Weight 2,075 lbs. Beam 8' 2'' Tested Weight N/A Draft 12'' Fuel Cap 21 gal. Deadrise/Transom 20 deg. Water Cap none Max Headroom open Bridge Clearance N/A Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Engine options Power 1 x 215-hp Supercharged Rotax® 4-TEC 4-Stroke Benefits of Jet Power In essence, jet power pumps water out the stern to push the boat through the water, rather than pulling a boat through the water by a propeller. Water is drawn from beneath the boat and forced through a pump inside the engine compartment, and then ejected out the back of the boat through a 6-inch diameter nozzle to propel the boat. The nozzle turns for steering, and a “reversing bucket” folds down over the nozzle to direct water straight down for neutral, and toward the bow for reverse. This offers several advantages over conventional propulsion. First is shallow draft. With rare exceptions, a propeller must be located under the bottom of a boat so it can bite into undisturbed water. Since a jet drive sucks water from below the boat and shoots it out the back, the Challenger 180 can go into water almost as shallow as the hull, about twelve inches. And with no outdrive to raise, beaching the boat is simple. One disadvantage to jets, the pump can get clogged with seaweed or debris, which is most likely to occur in very shallow water with a lot of loose seaweed on the bottom. Sea-Doo’s ICS system (Inlet Clearance System) cleans debris from the intake grid, but large amounts could still foul the pump. Improved Maneuverability Another advantage to Sea-Doo’s jet power is uncanny maneuverability. Because the jet system is always pumping water whenever the engine is running but redirecting the water for neutral or reverse, jet boats of the past were notoriously squirrelly in neutral and reverse. After testing two different Sea-Doo sportboats, I’m pleased to say the company has taken what was once considered a negative and turned it into a huge positive, particularly for beginner boaters. With the engine running and the shift in neutral, the Challenger 180 sits nearly stationary, drifting with the wind like a propeller driven boat would. But even though it is not “in gear”, the boat still steers by simply turning the wheel, hovering in one spot but still in control. To maneuver, just turn the wheel until the bow is pointed in the desired direction, shift into forward, and steer normally. While a twin engine boat with a bow thruster comes close, I have yet to run a conventional-powered recreational boat that has this ability. A third advantage to jet power, is not having a propeller outside the boat, creating much less chance of injuring a skier or swimmer, although it is always prudent to turn the engine off when a swimmer is alongside. Since a jet boat is always pumping water while running, I find it makes people turn the engine off instinctively – something often ignored on conventionally powered boats. Power and Performance To power the jet, Sea-Doo offers two Rotax engine choices, a 3-cylinder 185 horsepower four-stroke engine, and a similar engine with a supercharger and intercooler that develops 215 horsepower. Our test boat, equipped with the larger engine, topped out at 46 mph, and cruised quite economically at 28.7 mph, burning just 9.1 gph or 3.15 mpg. The boat planned off in 3.8 seconds and went from 0 to 30 in 7 seconds, with plenty of pulling power for water toys. Plenty of Features The layout of the boat should appeal to family boaters. Sea-Doo calls it a 20-foot cockpit in an 18-foot boat, and I must admit, it does have a lot of room for an 18-footer. There is plenty of seating, a large sun pad with the bow filler cushion installed, and adequate storage. The swim deck is nice too, with a telescoping boarding ladder and well placed handrails to make it easy to climb aboard. The new Challenger 180 has some great features, plus the added safety and maneuverability of Sea-Doo’s jet system, making it a great choice for an all-around family boat. Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) Test Result Highlights Top speed for the Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) is 46.0 mph (74 kph), burning 18.3 gallons per hour (gph) or 69.27 liters per hour (lph). Best cruise for the Sea-Doo Challenger 180 (2006-) is 28.7 mph (46.2 kph), and the boat gets 3.15 miles per gallon (mpg) or 1.34 kilometers per liter (kpl), giving the boat a cruising range of 60 miles (96.56 kilometers). Tested power is 1 x 215-hp Supercharged Rotax®.